Neon is the new Black

Cool map alert! These Neon Maps City Posters by Jay Powell might be the perfect map for your living room or office. They are suitable for framing and there are various cities to choose from: Moscow, New York, Melbourne just to name a few. Ah, and countries too! And… if your region/city/country/favourite intersection is not on the list yet, you might just get it by backing the project on Kickstarter! Check it out, you only have 6 days left.

Neon Maps MATC

Neon Maps Liverpool MATC

Neon Maps Santa Barbara MATC

Neon Maps MATC

Neon Maps MATC

Maps of Amsterdam

You know I live in Amsterdam. A great city to live in, also because of the charming canals that give the city its beauty and historical feel. In the Stadsarchief Amsterdam, an exhibtion called Booming Amsterdam just opened. The expo is about the building of the canals in the Golden Age. In 1613, Amsterdam was growing quickly and expansion was needed to house all people living in and coming to Amsterdam.The city council decided to build city canals. Booming Amsterdam gives you a great overview of 400 years of urban development. You will find maps, architectural plans and cityscapes to tell the city’s story. And it is quite the story!

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And of big importance to me: two books were also recently published: Kaarten van Amsterdam (Maps of Amsterdam), Part 1: Amsterdam from 1538-1865, Part 2: Amsterdam from 1866-2012.

Part 2 is an updated and extended version of a book published in 2002, Part 1 is completely new. I had the honour to speak with the author – Marc Hameleers- a few weeks ago and he told me the project has been a part of his life for the last 20 years. The base for these two books is a catalogue written by D’Ailly in 1934. Marc Hameleers: “A.E. d’Ailly was working at the Stadsarchief of Amsterdam (the municipal archives) and he wrote a very thorough, detailed catalogue of the maps of Amsterdam. Unfortunately not very exciting to read, but the content is impressive. Don’t forget: D’Ailly didn’t have the resources we have nowadays to research the existence and availability of maps. His research is really impressive.”

Obviously, there are some big differences between the catalogue from 1934 and these new books: D’Ailly included the maps in a chronological order of its content. This means a map from the 19th century would be found in the beginning of the overview because it presented Amsterdam in the 17th century). Hameleers decided to follow the chronology of the map itself, making the overview also useful to study the cartographical developments and focus. Another big difference: Hameleers included all different versions, fascimiles etc of one map in one catalogue number. This makes the overview the books offer much more useful and practical. The Stadsarchief Amsterdam has a huge collection of maps of Amsterdam, but research was also done in other collections worldwide to get closest to a complete overview as possible.
The result of these years of work by Hameleers? Two beautifully designed books (by Ronald Boiten and Irene Mesu) with almost 1100 images. The books are intriguing because of their massive amount of great content, super printing quality (the maps look great) and the information they provide about the development of my lovely city. A must have if you ask me!

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Information about the exhibition Booming Amsterdam:
15 February – 26 of May 2013
Admission adults: 6 euros
Adress: Stadsarchief Amsterdam, Vijzelstraat 32 Amsterdam
www.boomingamsterdam2013.nl

Information about the books:
Publisher: Thoth
ISBN: 978 90 6868 620 3 (part 1) and 978 90 6868 621 0 (part 2)
Price € 69,50 (per book)

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Beautiful Sea Charts Exhibition

This is a true beauty and a great excuse to go back to Paris real soon. In the Bibliothèque nationale de France you can find this exhibition (until January 27th 2013): L’Âge d’or des cartes marines – Quand l’Europe découvrait le monde (The Golden Age of Sea Charts).

Not alone are the maps in the exhibition beautiful and gives the expo a great overview of the discovery of the world and this category of maps, the library did a great job on presenting the subject. The website looks stunning. There should be a free iPhone and iPad app for the exhibition any day now, the catalogue looks very promising and the design of the exhibition (by Véronique Dollfus et Jeanne Bovier-Lapierre) should give you the immediate feeling you step into a portolan chart. Plus: 350 maps are made available on Gallica (the digital ‘jewel box’ of the library). This expo is a must go if you ask me. And let me know if you’ve visited the BnF!

Shapeshift Your Horizon

Are you ready to see the city from another angle? The project ‘Here & There‘ by BERG London is just what you need. By combining a viewpoint from the air plus one standing on the street, this gives you Manhattan in a totally new dimension. An impressive one, if you ask me. There were limited prints available for sale, when Here & There was presented in 2009. Since February 2012 Here & There is part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

 

 

 

Cartography in Modern Times

Well, we all know yesterday is history and tomorrow a mystery. But at the same time history is alive and kicking, and history of cartography also finds its way into modern communication. Nowadays, don’t be shocked if oldies like Johannes Tiberius Bodel Nijenhuis show up in your friends’ Facebook timeline. As explained on his profile, the goal of the profile for Johannes is the following: Mr. Johannes Tiberius Bodel Nijenhuis (1797-1872) bequeathed his collections of maps, atlases and topographical prints and drawings to Leiden University Library. This Facebook-page will be used to spread news about the Bodel Nijenhuis Collection and about the history of Dutch cartography. The page will be updated by Martijn Storms, curator of maps and atlases at Leiden University Library. Why wait? Become friends with him here.


The collection of Bodel Nijenhuis at the Leiden University Library is incredible: 300 atlases, 50.000 maps, 22.000 topographical drawings and prints and 15.500 portraits… And while you’re at it: check the exhibition that is on right now until the 27th of April in the Leiden University Library: Topographic Memory. Treasures from the collection of Dutch topography.