Squeeze that map!

This is a great invention. Dénes Sátor, a design student from Hungary, was inspired by globes and created this egg-shaped map. If you squeeze the map it pops out and shows you details of the city of Budapest. So, if you are stressed out about finding your way around Budapest, this map could be of assistance in two ways: reducing your stress levels and showing you the right way! Great thinking.

EggMap detail MATC


EggMap squeezed MATC

Polder Map Scarf

Here at Maps and the City, we are a huge fan of map inspired fashion. Look at this great example: this scarf is Dutch design by Studio Geanne. The design is called ‘Ingepolderd’, paying tribute to the Dutch habit of impoldering (creating polders). The fabric is produced in California and the scarfs are made in the Dutch city The Hague.

The scarf only costs 55 euros: Go for it!

Ingepolderd scarf Geanne-MATC

Dutch Map Cushions

Looking for something new in your interior? What about these great cushions by B/aR, by Dutch graphic designer Barbara Smit. Various maps of the Netherlands (for example maps of the water, forest or construction density) form the base for these colourful cushions. Check out her website for more info. I think they are a great addition of some map fun in your interior without going completely map nut.

Map cushions by B/aR

Map cushion by B/aR

Good Night Jewellery – Wake Up Post

I can pretend it did not take ages since my last post, but that would be unfair. I haven’t had much time for Maps and the City lately, which is a shame. Was there not enough cool map stuff out there? Definitely not! There’s more than enough beautiful and cool design things going on. So the good news is, I’m back with loads of inspiration. Here we go, let’s start with one of my recent finds on Etsy:

These cufflinks, rings and necklace pendants are handmade and called Good Night Rome, Good Night Berlin, Good Night Warsaw: you get the idea. The image on this jewellery is based on satellite night photos. The artist (Simon from FruitBijoux) added some gold metal particles to the surface to create a shimmering view on the city. Very pretty if you ask me!





Tube Lines Luggage Racks

The London Transport Museum has been busy celebrating 150 years of the London Underground. They’ve now launched this great range of coloured luggage racks. The luggage racks come from the decommissioned Metropolitan line Tube trains, were cleaned and powder-coated in colours based on the twelve metro lines of the London Underground. Oh oh, they do international shipping…


London Transport Museum photo on their Facebookpage

London Transport Museum rack

The colours in the range:
Blue – Piccadilly Line
Sky Blue – Victoria Line
Mint Green – Waterloo & City Line
Red – Central Line
Orange – Overground
Yellow – Circle Line
Pink – Hammersmith & City Line
Purple – Metropolitan
Green – District Line
Grey – Jubilee Line
Black – Northern Line
Bronze – Bakerloo Line
Gold – to celebrate 150 years of the underground (and Silver)
White – for the map background

(Photos: from the website and Facebookpage of the London Transport Museum)

A Map of the World

Gestalten recently added a new beauty to their range of impressive map books. ‘A Map of the World’ showcases contemporary maps by designers, illustrators and mapmakers from all over the world. As the publisher states: ‘Maps help us understand and navigate the world. For centuries, maps have become better, more refined, and more precise—there are no blind spots anymore. While Google Maps and GPS systems have become our tools of choice for navigation, contemporary maps have evolved into platforms for cutting-edge illustration, experimental data visualization, and personal visual storytelling.’ Couldn’t agree more! ‘A Map of the World’ consists of a great collection of maps, varying from very personal narrative maps to accurate street plans. Full of cartographic experiments, bright colours and enough pretty maps to look at once in a while: this book will make a great addition to your book collection. Oh, and do you remember the Cosmographies by Carlos Romo Melgar I blogged about last year? He is one of the featured artists in this book!

A Map of the World cover

A Map of the World

Map of the World page

Maps of Amsterdam

You know I live in Amsterdam. A great city to live in, also because of the charming canals that give the city its beauty and historical feel. In the Stadsarchief Amsterdam, an exhibtion called Booming Amsterdam just opened. The expo is about the building of the canals in the Golden Age. In 1613, Amsterdam was growing quickly and expansion was needed to house all people living in and coming to Amsterdam.The city council decided to build city canals. Booming Amsterdam gives you a great overview of 400 years of urban development. You will find maps, architectural plans and cityscapes to tell the city’s story. And it is quite the story!


And of big importance to me: two books were also recently published: Kaarten van Amsterdam (Maps of Amsterdam), Part 1: Amsterdam from 1538-1865, Part 2: Amsterdam from 1866-2012.

Part 2 is an updated and extended version of a book published in 2002, Part 1 is completely new. I had the honour to speak with the author – Marc Hameleers- a few weeks ago and he told me the project has been a part of his life for the last 20 years. The base for these two books is a catalogue written by D’Ailly in 1934. Marc Hameleers: “A.E. d’Ailly was working at the Stadsarchief of Amsterdam (the municipal archives) and he wrote a very thorough, detailed catalogue of the maps of Amsterdam. Unfortunately not very exciting to read, but the content is impressive. Don’t forget: D’Ailly didn’t have the resources we have nowadays to research the existence and availability of maps. His research is really impressive.”

Obviously, there are some big differences between the catalogue from 1934 and these new books: D’Ailly included the maps in a chronological order of its content. This means a map from the 19th century would be found in the beginning of the overview because it presented Amsterdam in the 17th century). Hameleers decided to follow the chronology of the map itself, making the overview also useful to study the cartographical developments and focus. Another big difference: Hameleers included all different versions, fascimiles etc of one map in one catalogue number. This makes the overview the books offer much more useful and practical. The Stadsarchief Amsterdam has a huge collection of maps of Amsterdam, but research was also done in other collections worldwide to get closest to a complete overview as possible.
The result of these years of work by Hameleers? Two beautifully designed books (by Ronald Boiten and Irene Mesu) with almost 1100 images. The books are intriguing because of their massive amount of great content, super printing quality (the maps look great) and the information they provide about the development of my lovely city. A must have if you ask me!


Information about the exhibition Booming Amsterdam:
15 February – 26 of May 2013
Admission adults: 6 euros
Adress: Stadsarchief Amsterdam, Vijzelstraat 32 Amsterdam

Information about the books:
Publisher: Thoth
ISBN: 978 90 6868 620 3 (part 1) and 978 90 6868 621 0 (part 2)
Price € 69,50 (per book)